Manhasset Bay Shipyard

Short hauls are a simple affair with Manhasset Bay Shipyard's 35-ton Travelift.
Short hauls are a simple affair with Manhasset Bay Shipyard's 35-ton Travelift.

Manhasset Bay Shipyard, a full-service marine center in Port Washington, New York.
Manhasset Bay Shipyard, a full-service marine center in Port Washington, New York.

Manhasset Bay Shipyard's services include winterizing, shrinkwrap, and storage.
Manhasset Bay Shipyard's services include winterizing, shrinkwrap, and storage.

451 Main Street
Port Washington, NY 11050
United States
40° 49' 41.5956" N, 73° 42' 12.1716" W
Contact:
George Martin, Shipyard Manager
Phone:
516-767-7447
Fax:
516-767-3760

Manhasset Bay Shipyard is a full-service marine center located on Manhasset Bay, at the western end of Long Island Sound, in Port Washington, New York. Whether you need a quick repair before you head out on the Sound, your bottom painted before the weekend races, or some rigging or electronics projects completed, the staff at our historic shipyard are ready to serve you. Services The yard offers a full range of services, including: •Storage (winter and summer) •Winterizing, Shrinkwrap •Rigging •Engine maintenance and repair •Bottom painting, varnishing •Electronics installation and repair •Short hauls Staff The Shipyard Manager and his staff are skilled in all aspects of boat maintenance and repair, including boat systems, fiberglass and gelcoat repair, bottom care, painting, and rigging. Our crew is reachable on VHF Channel 68 or by calling 516-767-SHIP (7447). History Manhasset Bay Shipyard has probably been used as a marine facility as far back as the post-Civil War period. In 1887, Elbert Stannard, a local resident and retired clipper ship captain, started a business converting wooden warships — made obsolete by steam engines and iron cladding — into freight and passenger vessels. Stannard's business likely included the current shipyard property. In 1889, six wooden warships and two coastal schooners owned by Stannard burned in a spectacular fire of unknown origin off Plum Point. Today, the small creek that runs along the southern side of the shipyard is known as Stannard's Creek.